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The last part of our series, following on from Part III. Because the causes of the lameness may be difficult to diagnose, a systematic diagnostic exam can be performed by the veterinarian to pinpoint to problem. Most experienced veterinarians have developed systems for examining horses for lameness...

Following on from Part II of our series. A surprising majority of lamenesses involve the foot. If the problem does appear to be related to the horse's lower limbs, feet, or hooves, a farrier may be able to diagnose the problem and provide corrective treatment. HORSEY PODIATRISTS Your farrier...

Following on from Part I of our series. Because each horse has individual characteristics, evaluating lameness can be challenging. Veterinarians have developed a lameness scale that ranges from one to five, with one being no perceptible lameness, and five being extremely lame: 1 = Lameness not perceptible Lameness...

So, your horse is hopping! What can you do to address the problem and how should you go about it? It is in everyone's best interest to take prompt action any time you have the least suspicion that something is not right with your horse, especially...

Classified among physical therapy/rehabilitation techniques, extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) remains an important tool for helping manage a variety of equine conditions and injuries, but also for maintaining your equine athlete and best friend. Problems that ESWT can help alleviate includeo: Tendinopathy / tendinitis, a leading...